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Estelle's Gifts & Jewelry

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                  Estelle's  Blog

   

            Plain and Simple.... Pearls

What Are Cultured Pearls?

Almost all pearl jewelry in the marketplace today is made up of cultured pearls which means they were produced with human assistance by oysters or other mollusks at a pearl farm as opposed to being found by divers.


To create a cultured pearl, a pearl farmer will trigger the natural process of pearl formation by inserting a small irritant into the oyster or mollusk. The oyster will then surround it with layer after layer of nacre. It is this nacre that gives pearls their beautiful luster.  Creating a cultured pearl can take from 6 months to 3 years.


What Types of Pearls Are There?

Cultured pearls may either be freshwater pearls or saltwater pearls, depending on the type of oyster or mollusk that produces them and the climate where the oyster lives.


Freshwater pearls are the most plentiful and affordable type of pearl on the market.  They come in a wide variety of shapes and colors, and are sometimes dyed to create a bright colorful look.


Saltwater akoya pearls are round, white (sometimes with a rose overtone), and are often used to make classic pearl necklaces or pearl earrings.


What Is Mother of Pearl?

Mother of Pearl is a type of shell so it can have much larger focal points. Most Mother of Pearl pieces are set as opposed to strung like a pearl necklace. It comes from the inside shell of a pearl producing oyster or mollusk. This shell is made up of nacre, the same material the oyster produces to coat a pearl.​

   Handbags

   Is faux leather better than real leather?

Durability Differences:

Faux leather, or PU leather, is not going to be as durable as real leather,  but it will be more

durable compared to Bonded Leather.

Bonded Leather is also called reconstituted leather or blended leather. It comes from animal hide but it differs from real leather in that it is not made of

100% animal hide.

Bonded leather is made by shredding leather scraps and leather fiber to form a pulp.

PU leather is not breathable and it can easily puncture and crack over time.

PU leather can be resistant to stains and is fade resistant, unlike bonded leather.


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Jewelry Cleaning

Posted on 20 January, 2020 at 8:45 Comments comments (118)

                                                                     

How to Clean Jewelry at Home:

 You don’t need fancy jewelry cleaner to get your silver to sparkle, your gold to gleam, and your gemstones to shine. Try these trusted everyday items, most of which you probably already have in the house.

 

Alka-Seltzer

Drop your dull-looking jewelry in a glass of fizzing Alka-Seltzer for a couple of minutes. It will sparkle and shine when you pull it out.


Aluminum foil

Simply line a small bowl with aluminum foil. Fill the bowl with hot water and mix in one tablespoon of bleach-free powdered laundry detergent (not liquid), like Tide. Put the jewelry in the solution and let it soak for one minute. Rinse well and air-dry. This procedure makes use of the chemical process known as ion exchange, which can also be used to clean silverware.

 

Ammonia

Brighten up your gold and silver trinkets by soaking them for ten minutes in a solution of 1/2 cup clear ammonia mixed in 1 cup warm water. Gently wipe clean with a soft cloth and let dry. Note: Do not do this with jewelry containing pearls, because it could dull or damage their delicate surface.

 

Baking Soda

To remove built-up tarnish from your silver, make a thick paste with 1/4 cup baking soda and 2 tablespoons water. Apply with a damp sponge and gently rub, rinse, and buff dry. To polish gold jewelry, cover with a light coating of baking soda, pour a bit of vinegar over it, and rinse clean. Note: Do not use this technique with jewelry containing pearls or gemstones, as it could damage their finish or loosen any glue.

 

Beer

Get the shine back in your solid gold (i.e., minus any gemstones) rings and other jewelry by pouring a bit of beer (not dark ale!) onto a soft cloth and rubbing it gently over the piece. Use a clean second cloth or towel to dry.


 Club Soda

Soak your diamonds, rubies, sapphires, and emeralds in club soda to give them a bright sheen. Simply place them in a glass full of club soda and let them soak overnight.

 

Denture Tablets

Has your diamond ring lost its sparkle? Here’s how to clean jewelry using denture tablets: Drop the tablet into a glass containing a cup of water. Follow that with your ring or diamond earrings. Let it sit for a few minutes. Remove your jewelry and rinse to reveal the old sparkle and shine.

 

Ketchup

Let ketchup do the work of shining tarnished silver. If your ring, bracelet, or earring has a smooth surface, dunk it in a small bowl of ketchup for a few minutes. If it has a tooled or detailed surface, use an old toothbrush to work ketchup into the crevices. To avoid damaging the silver, don’t leave the ketchup on any longer than necessary. Rinse your jewelry clean and dry it, and it’s ready to wear.

 

Toothpaste

Put a little toothpaste on an old toothbrush and use it to make your diamond ring sparkle instead of your teeth. Clean off the residue with a damp cloth.


Vinegar

Here’s how to clean jewelry to make it shine like brand new! Soak your pure silver bracelets, rings, and other jewelry in a mixture of 1/2 cup white vinegar and 2 tablespoons baking soda for two to three hours. Rinse them under cold water and dry thoroughly with a soft cloth.

 


Vodka

In a pinch, a few drops of vodka will clean any kind of glass or jewelry with crystalline gemstones. So although people might look at you askance, you could dip a napkin into your vodka on the rocks to wipe away the grime on your eyeglasses or dunk your diamond ring for a few minutes to get it sparkling again. But don’t try this with contact lenses! Also, avoid getting alcohol on any gemstone that’s not a crystal. Only diamonds, emeralds, and the like will benefit from a vodka bath.

 

Window Cleaner

Use window cleaner to spruce up jewelry that is all metal or has crystalline gemstones such as diamonds or rubies. Spray on the cleaner, then use an old toothbrush for cleaning. But don’t do this if the piece has opaque stones such as opal or turquoise, or organic gems such as coral or pearl. The ammonia and detergents in the cleaner can discolor these porous lovelies. Now that you know how to clean jewelry....

This article was published in Reader's Digest...

 

 

 

 

 


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